A Foolproof Tool for Motivating Your Team (and Yourself)

Ten years ago, I was managing a team of talented marketers at Yahoo! when something unexpected happened. In a one-on-one meeting, a woman on my team said to me, “I wanted you to know that if I ever do a really good job, just pay me more money. I don’t care about recognition or awards and I’m not motivated by praise. If I do well, just give me a bonus or pay me more.”

I stuttered through a response while feeling a bit taken aback by her comments. They seemed, well, a little crass.

But then, as I thought about it more overnight, I realized something: if this team member hadn’t told me what motivated her, I’d likely never know. What’s worse, I might try to reward her for good work in a way that would be motivating for me but not at all for her, leaving her frustrated and less likely to perform well in the future. It would be a lose-lose situation.

In fact, I thought, if I wanted her to be happy and productive in her job, the most helpful tools I could have in order to ensure her happiness were the details of what motivated her. This is true in other relationships, too. It is often referred to as the “platinum” rule: instead of using the “golden” rule of treating other people as you would like to be treated, treat them as they would like to be treated.

(As a side note, this practice is also useful outside of work. Here’s one real example from my own life: I personally love to be doted on when I’m sick, while my husband generally likes to be left alone. For the first few years of our relationship, he ignored me when I was sick, and I fussed over him to no end. Both of us were upset, until we realized we were making faulty assumptions about what the other person wanted based on our own preferences. Now that we’ve figured this out, things work much better!)

So, based on this illuminating conversation at the office, I decided that the best way to keep people happy at work was to start directly asking all the people on my teams what motivated them. To do so effectively, I created a tool: The Motivational Pie Chart. (Yes, it’s a pie chart, not real pie, so apologies to those who thought this would be an article about motivating your team with pie. Though, to be honest, that certainly works sometimes too….)

Using the tool is easy. You just follow these three steps:

Write down categories for everything that motivates you at work: recognition, money, learning new things, etc. You can write as many or as few things as you want and there are no pre-set categories. Anything that matters to you can go on your list.

Give each category a percentage weighting in order of its importance to you. The total weightings should add up to 100%, thus giving you a comprehensive pie chart of the things that motivate you.

Use a “red, yellow, green” color coding system to rate how satisfied you currently are with each of the categories on the list. If you are very satisfied with your compensation, give it a green. If you are completely dissatisfied with how challenged you feel in your job, give that a red, and so on.

If you are using the tool as a manager, the next step is to have an open conversation with each person on your team to talk about ways you can work together to “get them to green” on all of their categories. If you are using the tool for yourself, it can help you think about steps to take to make yourself happier at work, including thoughts about whether you are in the right role or at the right company. The reason the tool is foolproof is because it starts with asking each individual what matters and then helping each person find ways to do more of what matters.

Since that original conversation, I’ve used this tool with nearly a thousand people at four companies, and I’ve learned two important things:

1. People are really different.

Perhaps it goes without saying, but vastly different things motivate different people. Every time I do this exercise, I encounter something new. I’ve heard everything from people being passionate about hobbies (rock climbing, singing, etc.) that require them to have flexible work hours, to people saying they are motivated by external recognition and wanting to be on the cover of a magazine. I would never have known about these specific motivators for people if I hadn’t invited them to share. Good managers understand that the individuals on their teams are just that: individuals, with different interests and needs.

2. People are more similar than you’d think.

Despite all those differences, I’ve seen common patterns emerge that point at a few key motivational factors for most people.

They want “worthwhile work,” so they can know they’re doing something important and deserving of their time and energy.

They want to understand how their personal contribution is important to the goals of the organization.

They want to work with a team of people they admire and care about.

They want to learn new things and feel challenged by their jobs.

Are those common patterns surprising? They were for me at first. Perhaps partly because of that initial wake-up conversation I had at Yahoo!, I thought classic motivators like title and compensation would come up more, but for most people, they seem to make up a much smaller portion of the motivational pie.

The exception, of course, is that when people feel they are being paid significantly less than they are worth, they will often cite money as their top motivator. It’s analogous to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs: once people feel their basic needs are being met financially, and that they are paid fairly for their capabilities, then they quickly move on to focusing on motivators like meaning, collegiality and learning. Note that the pie chart can and does change over time. That is to be expected – just as our careers change, so do our motivations.

This tool can be incredibly useful, both for productive conversations between managers and their direct reports and at the company level to extract patterns of what matters across large numbers of your staff. At Change.org, we’ve taken these patterns of common motivators and built them into our company culture. To connect people to worthwhile work, we host an all-team call once a week where everyone in the company joins to share and learn about the incredible impact our 40 million users are making every day around the world. To help with building connections with colleagues and learning new things, we are starting a program to encourage staff members to shadow someone from another team for the day to build stronger relationships while picking up new skills. And we’re taking learning a step further, giving each employee access to free language training. (With staff in 18 countries, it’s also an essential team-building initiative!)

How could your company use the motivational pie chart to improve how it serves its employees? How could you use it personally or as a manager? Share your plan in the comments – and if you do give the chart a shot, let me know afterward what motivates you and your teams!

Source: Jennifer Dulski @jdulski

Jennifer Dulski is president and COO of Change.org, the world’s largest platform for social change. With 40 million users around the world, Change.org empowers people everywhere to create the change they want to see.

14 Toyota Way Principles

Toyota

Here is the briefly summary of the Toyota Way Principles:

  1. Base your management decisions on a long-term philosophy, even at the expense of short-term financial gains. Have a philosophical sense of purpose and mission that supersedes any short-term decision-making. Work, grow, and align the whole organization toward a common purpose that is bigger than making money.
  2. The Right Process will produce the Right Results. Don’t hide problems within the organization, but create continuous process flow to bring them to the surface.
  3. Avoid overproduction by following the principle of just-in-time — namely, customers should get what they want, when they want it, and in the amount they want.
  4. Eliminate waste of human and material resources. Also, strive to cut back to zero the amount of time that any work project is sitting idle or waiting for someone to work on it.
  5. Build a culture of stopping to fix problems, to get quality right the first time.
  6. Standardized tasks are the foundation for continuous improvement and employee empowerment. Capture the accumulated learning about a process by institutionalising today’s best practices and allows employees to improve the standard through creative self-expression.
  7. Use visual and manual control so that no problems are hidden.
  8. Use technology to support people, not to replace people. Reject or modify technologies that conflict with your work culture. Nevertheless, encourage your people to consider new technologies when looking into new approaches to work.
  9. Develop such leaders in your organization who thoroughly understand the work, live the philosophy, and teach it to others. Do not view the leader’s job as simply accomplishing tasks. Leaders must be role models of the company’s philosophy and way of doing business.
  10. Develop exceptional people and teams who follow your company’s philosophy. Make an ongoing effort to teach individuals to work together as teams toward common goals.
  11. Have respect for your business partners and suppliers and treat them as an extension of your business.
  12. Continuously solving root problems improves organizational learning. Even high-level managers should go and see things for themselves, so that they will have more than a superficial understanding of the situation.
  13. Make decisions slowly by consensus, thoroughly considering all options; but implement decisions rapidly.
  14. Become a learning organization through relentless reflection (Hansei) and continuous improvement (Kaizen). Protect the organization’s knowledge and cultural base by developing stable personnel, careful promotion, and well thought-out succession systems.

Source: Toyota Way

Manias vs. Phobias – Part 2: Phobias (2)

The following comes from The Phobia List by Fredd Culbertson. All rights reserved. Any phobias found in Phobias (1) will not be repeated.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


A

Achluophobia–Fear of darkness.
Aeroacrophobia–Fear of open high places.
Aeronausiphobia–Fear of vomiting secondary to airsickness.
Agliophobia–Fear of pain.
Agraphobia–Fear of sexual abuse.
Agrizoophobia–Fear of wild animals.
Agyrophobia–Fear of streets or crossing the street.
Albuminurophobia–Fear of kidney disease.
Alektorophobia–Fear of chickens.
Alliumphobia–Fear of garlic.
Allodoxaphobia–Fear of opinions.
Altophobia–Fear of heights.
Ambulophobia–Fear of walking.
Amnesiphobia–Fear of amnesia.
Ancraophobia–Fear of wind.
Anglophobia–Fear of England, English culture, etc.
Angrophobia–Fear of becoming angry.
Ankylophobia–Fear of immobility of a joint.
Anthrophobia–Fear of flowers.
Anuptaphobia–Fear of staying single.
Aphenphosmphobia–Fear of being touched.
Apotemnophobia–Fear of persons with amputations.
Arachibutyrophobia–Fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of the mouth.
Arachnephobia–Fear of spiders.
Arithmaphobia–Fear of numbers.
Arrhenphobia–Fear of men.
Arsonphobia–Fear of fire.
Asymmetriphobia–Fear of asymmetrical things.
Ataxiophobia–Fear of ataxia.
Atelophobia–Fear of imperfection.
Athazagoraphobia–Fear of being forgotten or ignored or forgetting.
Atomosophobia–Fear of atomic explosions.
Atychiphobia–Fear of failure.
Aulophobia–Fear of flutes.
Aurophobia–Fear of gold.
Autodysomophobia–Fear of one that has a vile odor.
Automatonophobia–Fear of ventriloquist’s dummies, animatronic creatures, wax or statues–anything that falsely represents a sentient being.
Aviatophobia–Fear of flying.
Aviophobia–Fear of flying.

B

Bacteriophobia–Fear of bacteria.
Batonophobia–Fear of plants.
Bibliophobia–Fear of books.
Blennophobia–Fear of slime.
Bogyphobia–Fear of bogies or the bogeyman.
Bolshephobia–Fear of Bolsheviks.
Bromidrophobia–Fear of body smells.
Bufonophobia–Fear of toads.

C

Cacophobia–Fear of ugliness.
Cainophobia–Fear of newness, novelty.
Caligynephobia–Fear of beautiful women.
Catagelophobia–Fear of being ridiculed.
Catapedaphobia–Fear of jumping from high and low places.
Cathisophobia–Fear of sitting.
Ceraunophobia–Fear of thunder.
Chaetophobia–Fear of hair.
Chemophobia–Fear of chemicals or working with chemicals.
Chiraptophobia–Fear of being touched.
Cholerophobia–Fear of anger.
Chorophobia–Fear of dancing.
Chrometophobia–Fear of money.
Chronomentrophobia–Fear of clocks.
Cleisiophobia–Fear of being locked in an enclosed place.
Cleithrophobia–Fear of being locked in an enclosed place.
Cleptophobia–Fear of stealing.
Clinophobia–Fear of going to bed.
Cnidophobia–Fear of strings.
Coimetrophobia–Fear of cemeteries.
Contreltophobia–Fear of sexual abuse.
Coprastasophobia–Fear of constipation.
Coulrophobia–Fear of clowns.
Counterphobia–The preference by a phobic for fearful situations.
Cryophobia–Fear of extreme cold, ice or frost.
Cyberphobia–Fear of computers or working on a computer.
Cyclophobia–Fear of bicycles.
Cymophobia–Fear of waves or wave-like motions.
Cyprinophobia–Fear of prostitutes or venereal disease.

D

Daemonophobia–Fear of demons.
Deipnophobia–Fear of dining and dinner conversations.
Dementophobia–Fear of insanity.
Dendrophobia–Fear of trees.
Dentophobia–Fear of dentists.
Dermatopathophobia–Fear of skin disease.
Diabetophobia–Fear of diabetes.
Didaskaleinophobia–Fear of going to school.
Dinophobia–Fear of dizziness or whirlpools.
Diplophobia–Fear of double vision.
Dishabiliophobia–Fear of undressing in front of someone.
Dutchphobia–Fear of the Dutch.
Dystychiphobia–Fear of accidents.

E

Ecclesiophobia–Fear of church.
Ecophobia–Fear of home.
Eicophobia–Fear of home surroundings.
Eleutherophobia–Fear of freedom.
Elurophobia–Fear of cats.
Enetophobia–Fear of pins.
Enochlophobia–Fear of crowds.
Enosiophobia–Fear of having committed an unpardonable sin.
Epistaxiophobia–Fear of nosebleeds.
Epistemophobia–Fear of knowledge.
Equinophobia–Fear of horses.
Ereuthophobia–Fear of blushing.
Erytophobia–1. Fear of red lights. 2. Fear of blushing.
Euphobia–Fear of hearing good news.

F

Felinophobia–Fear of cats.
Fibriophobia–Fear of fever.
Fibriphobia–Fear of fever.
Francophobia–Fear of France, French culture.
Frigophobia–Fear of cold, cold things.

G

Galiophobia–Fear of France, French culture.
Gallophobia–Fear of France, French culture.
Geliophobia–Fear of laughter.
Geniophobia–Fear of chins.
Genuphobia–Fear of knees.
Gephydrophobia–Fear of crossing bridges.
Gephysrophobia–Fear of crossing bridges.
Gerascophobia–Fear of growing old.
Germanophobia–Fear of Germany, German culture, etc.
Gerontophobia–Fear of old people or of growing old.

H

Hagiophobia–Fear of saints or holy things.
Hellenologophobia–Fear of Greek terms or complex scientific terminology.
Hemaphobia–Fear of blood.
Hereiophobia–Fear of challenges to official doctrine or of radical deviation.
Heresyphobia–Fear of challenges to official doctrine or of radical deviation.
Herpetophobia–Fear of reptiles or creepy, crawly things.
Heterophobia–Fear of the opposite sex.
Hippophobia–Fear of horses.
Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia–Fear of long words.
Hobophobia–Fear of bums or beggars.
Homilophobia–Fear of sermons.
Hominophobia–Fear of men.
Hoplophobia–Fear of firearms.
Hyalophobia–Fear of glass.
Hydrargyophobia–Fear of mercurial medicines.
Hylephobia–1. Fear of materialism. 2. Fear of epilepsy.
Hypegiaphobia–Fear of responsibility.

I

Iatrophobia–Fear of going to the doctor.
Illyngophobia–Fear of vertigo or feeling dizzy when looking down.
Insectophobia–Fear of insects.
Isopterophobia–Fear of termites, insects that eat wood.
Ithyphallophobia–Fear of seeing, thinking about or having an erect penis.

J

Japanophobia–Fear of Japanese.
Judeophobia–Fear of Jews.

K

Katagelophobia–Fear of ridicule.
Kinetophobia–Fear of movement or motion.
Koinoniphobia–Fear of rooms.
Kolpophobia–Fear of genitals, particularly female.
Koniophobia–Fear of dust.
Kosmikophobia–Fear of cosmic phenomenon.
Kymophobia–Fear of waves.
Kynophobia–Fear of rabies.
Kyphophobia–Fear of stooping.

L

Lachanophobia–Fear of vegetables.
Latrophobia–Fear of doctors.
Lepraphobia–Fear of leprosy.
Leprophobia–Fear of leprosy.
Leukophobia–Fear of the color white.
Ligyrophobia–Fear of loud noises.
Lilapsophobia–Fear of tornadoes and hurricanes.
Limnophobia–Fear of lakes.
Liticaphobia–Fear of lawsuits.
Lockiophobia–Fear of childbirth.
Logizomechanophobia–Fear of computers.
Logophobia–Fear of words.
Luiphobia–Fear of lues, syphilis.
Lutraphobia–Fear of otters.
Lygophobia–Fear of darkness.

M

Macrophobia–Fear of long waits.
Mageirocophobia–Fear of cooking.
Maieusiophobia–Fear of childbirth.
Malaxophobia–Fear of love play.
Mastigophobia–Fear of punishment.
Medomalacuphobia–Fear of losing an erection.
Medorthophobia–Fear of an erect penis.
Melanophobia–Fear of the color black.
Melophobia–Fear or hatred of music.
Menophobia–Fear of menstruation.
Metathesiophobia–Fear of changes.
Methyphobia–Fear of alcohol.
Metrophobia–Fear or hatred of poetry.
Misophobia–Fear of being contaminated with dirt or germs.
Mnemophobia–Fear of memories.
Motorphobia–Fear of automobiles.
Mottephobia–Fear of moths.
Murophobia–Fear of mice.
Mycophobia–Fear or aversion to mushrooms.
Mycrophobia–Fear of small things.
Myctophobia–Fear of darkness.
Myrmecophobia–Fear of ants.
Myxophobia–Fear of slime.

N

Nebulaphobia–Fear of fog.
Negrophobia–Fear of Negroes.
Nelophobia–Fear of glass.
Neopharmaphobia–Fear of new drugs.
Nephophobia–Fear of clouds.
Nomatophobia–Fear of names.
Nosemaphobia–Fear of becoming ill.
Nosocomephobia–Fear of hospitals.
Nostophobia–Fear of returning home.
Novercaphobia–Fear of your mother-in-law.
Nucleomituphobia–Fear of nuclear weapons.
Numerophobia–Fear of numbers.
Nyctohylophobia–Fear of dark wooded areas, of forests at night.

O

Obesophobia–Fear of gaining weight.
Ochophobia–Fear of vehicles.
Octophobia–Fear of the figure 8.
Odynephobia–Fear of pain.
Oenophobia–Fear of wines.
Ommetaphobia–Fear of eyes.
Oneirophobia–Fear of dreams.
Oneirogmophobia–Fear of wet dreams.
Ophthalmophobia–Fear of being stared at.
Optophobia–Fear of opening one’s eyes.
Orthophobia–Fear of property.
Ostraconophobia–Fear of shellfish.
Ouranophobia–Fear of heaven.

P

Pagophobia–Fear of ice or frost.
Panthophobia–Fear of suffering and disease.
Papaphobia–Fear of the Pope.
Papyrophobia–Fear of paper.
Paralipophobia–Fear of neglecting duty or responsibility.
Paraskavedekatriaphobia–Fear of Friday the 13th.
Peccatophobia–Fear of sinning.
Pedophobia–Fear of children.
Peladophobia–Fear of bald people.
Pellagrophobia–Fear of pellagra.
Pentheraphobia–Fear of mother-in-law.
Phalacrophobia–Fear of becoming bald.
Phallophobia–Fear of a penis, esp. erect.
Phasmophobia–Fear of ghosts.
Philemaphobia–Fear of kissing.
Philematophobia–Fear of kissing.
Philophobia–Fear of falling in love or being in love.
Philosophobia–Fear of philosophy.
Photoaugliaphobia–Fear of glaring lights.
Placophobia–Fear of tombstones.
Plutophobia–Fear of wealth.
Pluviophobia–Fear of rain or of being rained on.
Pneumatiphobia–Fear of spirits.
Pnigophobia–Fear of choking or being smothered.
Pocrescophobia–Fear of gaining weight.
Pogonophobia–Fear of beards.
Poliosophobia–Fear of contracting polio myelitis.
Politicophobia–Fear or abnormal dislike of politicians.
Potophobia–Fear of alcohol.
Prosophobia–Fear of progress.
Psellismophobia–Fear of stuttering.
Psychophobia–Fear of mind.
Pteromerhanophobia–Fear of flying.
Pyrexiophobia–Fear of fever.

R

Ranidaphobia–Fear of frogs.
Rhytiphobia–Fear of getting wrinkles.
Russophobia–Fear of Russians.

S

Sarmassophobia–Fear of love play.
Scatophobia–Fear of fecal matter.
Sciaphobia–Fear of shadows.
Sciophobia–Fear of shadows.
Scoleciphobia–Fear of worms.
Scolionophobia–Fear of school.
Scotomaphobia–Fear of blindness in visual field.
Scriptophobia–Fear of writing in public.
Selaphobia–Fear of light flashes.
Selenophobia–Fear of the moon.
Seplophobia–Fear of decaying matter.
Sesquipedalophobia–Fear of long words.
Sexophobia–Fear of the opposite sex.
Shamhainophobia–Fear of Halloween.
Sinistrophobia–Fear of things to the left, left-handed.
Sinophobia–Fear of Chinese, Chinese culture.
Sitiophobia–Fear of food or eating.
Snakephobia–Fear of snakes.
Soceraphobia–Fear of parents-in-law.
Social Phobia–Fear of being evaluated negatively in social situations.
Sociophobia–Fear of society or people in general.
Somniphobia–Fear of sleep.
Sophophobia–Fear of learning.
Soteriophobia–Fear of dependence on others.
Spacephobia–Fear of outer space.
Spermophobia–Fear of germs.
Spheksophobia–Fear of wasps.
Staurophobia–Fear of crosses or the crucifix.
Stenophobia–Fear of narrow things or places.
Stigiophobia–Fear of hell.
Suriphobia–Fear of mice.
Symmetrophobia–Fear of symmetry.
Syngenesophobia–Fear of relatives.

T

Tachophobia–Fear of speed.
Taphophobia–Fear of being buried alive or of cemeteries.
Tapinophobia–Fear of being contagious.
Taurophobia–Fear of bulls.
Technophobia–Fear of technology.
Teleophobia–1. Fear of definite plans. 2. Religious ceremony.
Telephonophobia–Fear of telephones.
Teniophobia–Fear of tapeworms.
Testophobia–Fear of taking tests.
Tetanophobia–Fear of lockjaw, tetanus.
Teutophobia–Fear of Germany or German things.
Textophobia–Fear of certain fabrics.
Thantophobia–Fear of death or dying.
Theatrophobia–Fear of theatres.
Theologicophobia–Fear of theology.
Tomophobia–Fear of surgical operations.
Tonitrophobia–Fear of thunder.
Toxophobia–Fear of poison or of being accidently poisoned.
Trichophobia–Fear of hair.
Tropophobia–Fear of moving or making changes.
Trypanophobia–Fear of injections.
Tyrannophobia–Fear of tyrants.

U

Uranophobia–Fear of heaven.
Urophobia–Fear of urine or urinating.

V

Venustraphobia–Fear of beautiful women.
Verbophobia–Fear of words.
Verminophobia–Fear of germs.
Vestiphobia–Fear of clothing.
Virginitiphobia–Fear of rape.
Vitricophobia–Fear of step-father.

W

Walloonphobia–Fear of the Walloons.
Wicaphobia–Fear of witches and witchcraft.

X

Xanthophobia–Fear of the color yellow or the word yellow.
Xerophobia–Fear of dryness.
Xylophobia–1. Fear of wooden objects. 2. Fear of forests.

Z

Zemmiphobia–Fear of the great mole rat.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Source: The Phobia List by Fredd Culbertson

Manias vs. Phobias – Part 2: Phobias (1)

… continue from Manias vs. Phobias – Part 1: Manias (2)

The following lists of phobic definitions are excerpts from Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary and The Phobia List by Fredd Culbertson.

Phobias

-phobia [Gr.]. Suffix indicating abnorrmal fear of, or aversion to, a subject.

The following comes from Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


A

Acarophobia–Abnormal fear of mites or worms.
Acerophobia–Fear of sourness.
Acousticophobia–Abnormal fear of loud sounds.
Acrophobia–Morbid fear of high places.
Aerophobia–Morbid fear of a draft or of fresh air.
Agoraphobia–Great fear of being alone, or of being in public places from which escape might be difficult. Normal activities that involve being in crowds, or on a busy street or in a crowded store, are avoided. Exposure to these conditions may cause the individual to panic.
Agyiophobia–Fear of streets.
Aichmophobia–Morbid fear of being touched by pointed objects or fingers.
Ailurophobia–Morbid fear of cats.
Algophobia–Morbid fear of pain.
Amathophobia–Fear of dust.
Amaxophobia–Fear of being in vehicles.
Amychophobia–Morbid fear of being scratched; fear of the claws of any animal.
Androphobia–Morbid fear of the male sex.
Anemophobia–Morbid fear of drafts or of the wind.
Anginophobia–Morbid fear of an attack of angina pectoris (severe pain and constriction about the heart).
Anthophobia–Morbid dislike or fear of flowers.
Anthropophobia–Fear of people.
Antlophobia–Fear of floods.
Apeirophobia–Fear of infinity.
Aphephobia–Morbid fear of being touched.
Apiphobia–Fear of bees.
Aquaphobia–Abnormal fear of water.
Arachnophobia–Morbid fear of spiders.
Asthenophobia–Fear of weakness.
Astraphobia–Fear of thunder and lightning.
Astrapophobia–Fear of lightning.
Astrophobia–Morbid fear of stars and celestial space.
Ataxophobia–Morbid dread of disorder or untidiness.
Atephobia–Fear of ruin.
Auroraphobia–Fear of the northern lights.
Automysophobia–Fear of personal filth or odor.
Autophobia–1. A psychoneurotic fear of being alone. 2. Abnormal fear of being egotistical.

B

Bacillophobia–Morbid fear of bacilli.
Ballistophobia–Fear of missiles.
Barophobia–Fear of gravity.
Basiphobia–Fear of walking.
Basophobia–1. Abnormal fear of walking. 2. Emotional inability to stand or walk in the absence of muscle disease.
Bathophobia–Abnormal fear of depths. Commonly refers to fear of height or of looking down from a high place.
Batophobia–Fear of high objects or being on tall buildings.
Batrachophobia–Fear of frogs.
Belonephobia–Morbid fear of sharp-pointed objects.
Bromidrosiphobia–Abnormal fear of personal odors, accompanied by hallucinations.
Brontophobia–Abnormal fear of thunder.

C

Cainotophobia–Fear of novelty.
Cancerophobia–Morbid fear of cancer.
Carcinomatophobia–Morbid fear of carcinoma (a new growth or malignant tumor that occurs in epithelial tissue).
Cardiophobia–Morbid fear of heart disease.
Carnophobia–Abnormal aversion to meat.
Catoptrophobia–Morbid fear of mirrors or of breaking them.
Cenophobia–Fear of barren or empty spaces. Fear of emptiness.
Cenotophobia–Morbid aversion to new things and new ideas.
Cheimaphobia–Fear of cold or something cold.
Cherophobia–Morbid fear of and aversion to gaiety.
Chionphobia–Fear of snow.
Cholerophobia–Morbid fear of acquiring cholera (An acute infection involving the entire small bowel, characterized by profuse watery diarrhea and vomiting, which produces severe loss of fluids and electrolytes, muscular cramps, oliguria, dehydration, and collapse.
Chrematophobia–Fear of money.
Chromatophobia–Fear of color.
Chromophobia–Condition of staining poorly.
Chronophobia–Fear of time.
Cibophobia–A morbid aversion to or fear of food.
Claustrophobia–Fear of being confined in any space, as in a locked room. Opposite of agoraphobia.
Climacophobia–Fear of stairs.
Clithrophobia–Morbid fear of being locked in.
Coitophobia–Morbid fear of sexual intercourse.
Cometophobia–Fear of comets.
Coprophobia–A morbid disgust at defecation and feces.
Cremnophobia–Fear of precipices.
Crystallophobia–Abnormal fear of glass or objects made of glass.
Cynophobia–1. Unreasonable fear of dogs. 2. Morbid fear of rabies.
Cypridophobia–1. Morbid fear of venereal disease. 2. Abnormal fear of the sexual act. 3. False belief of having a venereal disease.
Cypriphobia–Morbid aversion to and fear of coitus.

D

Decidophobia–Fear of making a decision.
Defecalgesiophobia–Fear of defecating because of pain.
Demonophobia–Fear of demons.
Demophobia–Fear of crowds.
Dermatophobia–Abnormal fear of having a skin disease.
Dermatosiophobia–Fear of skin disease.
Dextrophobia–Abnormal aversion to objects on the right side of the body.
Dikephobia–Fear of justice.
Domatophobia–Abnormal aversion to being in a house; a form of claustrophobia.
Doraphobia–Abnormal aversion to touching the hair or fur of animals.
Dromophobia–Fear of crossing streets.
Dysmorphophobia–Morbid fear of deformity.

E

Eisoptrophobia–Fear of mirrors and seeing oneself in a mirror.
Electrophobia–Fear of electricity.
Emetophobia–Fear of vomiting.
Enissophobia–Fear of criticism, esp. for having committed a sin.
Entomophobia–Fear of insects.
Eosophobia–Fear of dawn.
Eremophobia–Dread of being alone.
Ereuthrophobia–Pathological fear of blushing.
Ergasiophobia–Abnormal dislike for work of any kind or for assuming responsibility.
Ergophobia–Morbid dread of working.
Erotophobia–Aversion to sexual love or its manifestations.
Erythrophobia–1. Abnormal dread of blushing or fear of being diffident or of being embarrassed. 2. A morbid fear of, or aversion to, anything colored red.
Eurotophobia–Fear of female genitals.

F

Febriphobia–Anxiety or fear induced by a rise in body temperature.

G

Galeophobia–Abnormal aversion to cats.
Gamophobia–Neurotic fear of marriage.
Gatophobia–Fear of cats.
Genophobia–Fear of sex.
Gephyrophobia–Aversion to bodies of water, to crossing on bridges over water, or traveling on boats.
Geumaphobia–Abnormal dislike or fear of tastes.
Graphophobia–Abnormal fear of writing.
Gymnophobia–Abnormal aversion to viewing a naked body.
Gynephobia–Abnormal aversion to the company of women, or fear of them.
Gynophobia–Fear of women.

H

Hadephobia–Fear of hell.
Hamartophobia–Fear of sin.
Haphephobia–Aversion to being touched by another person.
Haptephobia–Fear of being touched.
Harpaxophobia–Fear of robbers.
Hedonophobia–Fear of pleasure.
Heliophobia–Abnormal fear of the sun’s rays, esp. By one who has suffered a sunstroke.
Helminthophobia–Morbid dread of worms or delusion of being infested by them.
Hematophobia–Hemophobia.
Hemophobia–Aversion to seeing blood or to bleeding.
Hierophobia–Abnormal fear of sacred things or persons connected with religion.
Hodophobia–Fear of travel.
Homichlophobia–Fear of fog.
Homophobia–Fear or dislike of homosexuals.
Hormephobia–Fear of shock.
Hydrophobia–1. Morbid fear of water. 2. Common name for rabies, q.v., resulting from bite of a rabid animal.
Hydrophobophobia–Morbid fear of contracting hydrophobia (rabies), sometimes resulting in a hysterical condition resembling hydrophobia.
Hyelophobia–Fear of glass.
Hygrophobia–Fear of dampness or moisture.
Hylophobia–Fear of forests.
Hypengyophobia–Fear of responsibility.
Hypertrichophobia–Fear of hair on the body.
Hypnophobia–Morbid fear of falling asleep.
Hypsophobia–Fear of being at great heights.

I

Ichthyophobia–Aversion to fish.
Ideophobia–Fear of ideas.
Iophobia–1. Fear of being poisoned. 2. Fear of touching any rusty object.
Isolophobia–Fear of being alone.

K

Kainophobia–Abnormal aversion to new situations and things.
Kainotophobia–Fear of change or novelty.
Kakorrhaphiophobia–Fear of failure.
Kathisophobia–Fear of sitting down, and subsequent inability to sit still.
Kenophobia–Fear of empty spaces.
Keraunophobia–Dread of thunder and lightning.
Kinesophobia–Fear of motion.
Kleptophobia–Morbid fear of stealing.
Kopophobia–Abnormal fear of fatigue or exhaustion.

L

Laliophobia–Fear of speaking/Fear of talking.
Lalophobia–Morbid reluctance to speak due to fear of stammering or committing errors.
Levophobia–Morbid dread of objects on the left side of the body.
Linonophobia–Fear of string.
Lyssophobia–1. Hysteria resembling rabies. 2. Fear of rabies.

M

Maniaphobia–Fear of becoming insane.
Mechanophobia–Fear of machinery.
Megalophobia–Fear of large objects.
Melissophobia–Abnormal fear of bee or wasp stings.
Meningitophobia–A condition that simulates meningitis and is caused by fear of meningitis.
Merinthophobia–Morbid fear of being tied.
Metallophobia–Abnormal fear of metals and metallic objects and of touching them.
Meteorophobia–Fear of meteors.
Microbiophobia–An abnormal fear of germs.
Microphobia–1. Psychopathic fear of microbes. 2. Morbid dread of small objects.
Molysmophobia–Morbid fear of contamination or infection.
Monopathophobia–Fear of a definite, specific disease.
Monophobia–Abnormal fear of being alone.
Musophobia–Fear of mice.
Mysophobia–Abnormal aversion to dirt or contamination.
Mythophobia–Abnormal dread of making a false or incorrect statement.

N

Necrophobia–1. Abnormal aversion to dead bodies. 2. Insane dread of death.
Neophobia–Fear of new scenes or novelties; aversion to all that is unknown or not understood.
Noctiphobia–Fear of the night and darkness.
Nosophobia–Abnormal aversion to illness or to a particular affection.
Nudophobia–Abnormal fear of being unclothed.
Nyctophobia–Abnormal dread of the night or of darkness.

O

Ochlophobia–Abnormal dread of crowds or populated places.
Odontophobia–1. Abnormal aversion to the sight of teeth. 2. Abnormal fear of dental surgery.
Odynophobia–Abnormal dread of pain.
Oikophobia–Morbid dislike of the home.
Olfactophobia–Fear of odor.
Ombrophobia–Fear and anxiety induced by storms, threatening clouds, or rain.
Ommatophobia–Fear of eyes.
Onomatophobia–Abnormal fear of hearing a certain name or word because of an imaginary dreadful meaning attached to it.
Ophidiophobia–Abnormal fear of snakes.
Ornithophobia–Fear of birds.
Osmophobia–Morbid fear of odors.
Osphresiophobia–Fear of odors.

P

Panophobia–Morbid fear of some unknown evil or of everything in general; general apprehension.
Panphobia–Groundless fear of everything.
Pantophobia–Morbid, groundless fear of everything in general.
Paraphobia–A mild form of phobia.
Parasitophobia–Unusual fear of parasites.
Parthenophobia–Fear of virgins or girls.
Parturiphobia–Fear of childbirth.
Pathophobia–Morbid fear of disease.
Patroiophobia–Fear of heredity and hereditary disease.
Peccatiphobia–Abnormal dread of sinning.
Pediculophobia–Abnormal dread of lice.
Pediophobia–Fear of dolls.
Peniaphobia–Fear of poverty.
Phagophobia–Dread of being eaten.
Pharmacophobia–Abnormal fear of taking medicines.
Phengophobia–Abnormal dread of light.
Phobophobia–Morbid fear of acquiring a phobia.
Phonophobia–1. Morbid fear of sound or noise. 2. Fear of speaking or hearing one’s own voice.
Photaugiaphobia–Intolerance of bright light.
Photophobia–Unusual intolerance of light. Occurs in measles and rubella, meningitis, and inflammation of the eyes.
Phronemophobia–Fear of thinking.
Phthiriophobia–Abnormal dread of lice.
Phthisiophobia–Fear of tuberculosis.
Pnigerophobia–Morbid fear of choking; sometimes experienced in angina pectoris.
Poinephobia–Fear of punishment.
Polyphobia–Excessive or abnormal fear of a number of things.
Ponophobia–1. Abnormal distaste for exerting oneself. 2. Dread of pain.
Potamophobia–A morbid fear of large bodies of water.
Proctophobia–Abnormal apprehension in those suffering from rectal disease.
Proteinophobia–Aversion to foods containing protein.
Psychrophobia–Abnormal aversion or sensitiveness to cold.
Pteronophobia–Fear of feathers.
Pyrexeophobia–Fear of fever.
Pyrophobia–Abnormal fear of fire.

R

Radiophobia–Abnormal fear of x-rays and radiation.
Rectophobia–Acute anxiety concerning the possibility of having cancer in those patients with rectal disease.
Rhabdophobia–Abnormal fear of being hit or beaten with a stick or rod.
Rhypophobia–Abnormal disgust at the act of defecation, feces, or filth.
Rupophobia–Abnormal dislike for dirt or filth.

S

Satanophobia–Fear of the devil.
Scabiophobia–Fear of scabies.
Scabiphobia–Abnormal fear of acquiring scabies.
Scelerophobia–Fear of bad men or burglars.
School Phobia–Fear of schools.
Scopophobia–Abnormal fear of being seen.
Scotophobia–Abnormal dread of darkness.
Siderodromophobia–Morbid fear of railway travel.
Siderophobia–Fear of stars.
Sitophobia–Psychoneurotic abhorrence of food, or morbid dread of or repugnance to food, whether generally or only to specific dishes.
Spectrophobia–Fear of mirrors and seeing oneself in a mirror.
Spermatophobia–Abnormal fear of being afflicted with spermatorrhea, involuntary loss of semen.
Stasibasiphobia–Delusion of one’s inability to stand or walk, or fear to make the attempt.
Stasiphobia–Delusion of one’s inability to stand erect or hesitation to make the attempt.
Stygiophobia–Fear of hell.
Symbolophobia–Hesitancy in expressing one’s self in words or action for fear that it may be interpreted as possessing a symbolic meaning.
Syphiliphobia–Morbid fear of syphilis.
Syphilophobia–1. Morbid fear of syphilis. 2. Delusion of having syphilis.

T

Tabophobia–A morbid fear of being afflicted with tabes, a common symptom of neurasthenia.
Taeniophobia–Morbid fear of becoming infested with tapeworms.
Taphephobia–Abnormal fear of being buried alive.
Teratophobia–Abnormal fear of giving birth to a malformed fetus or of being in contact with one.
Thaasophobia–Fear of sitting.
Thalassophobia–Abnormal fear of the sea.
Thanatophobia–Morbid fear of death.
Theophobia–Abnormal fear of the wrath of God.
Thermophobia–Abnormal fear of heat.
Tocophobia–Abnormal fear of childbirth.
Topophobia–A fear of psychoneurotic origin in relation to a particular locality.
Toxicophobia–Abnormal fear of being poisoned by any medium: food, gas, water or drugs.
Toxiphobia–Abnormal fear of being poisoned.
Traumatophobia–Fear of injury.
Tremophobia–Abnormal fear of trembling.
Triakaidekaphobia–Superstition regarding the number 13.
Trichinophobia–Abnormal fear of developing trichinosis.
Trichopathophobia–Morbid fear of hair on the face experienced by women, or any abnormal anxiety regarding hair.
Triskaidekaphobia–Superstition concerning the number 13.
Tuberculophobia–An abnormal fear of being infected with tuberculosis.

V

Vaccinophobia–Fear of vaccination.
Venereophobia–Abnormal fear of venereal disease.
Vermiphobia–An abnormal fear of being infested with worms.

X

Xenophobia–Abnormal dread of strangers.

Z

Zelophobia–Fear of jealousy.
Zoophobia–Abnormal fear of animals.


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continue to Manias vs. Phobias – Part 2: Phobias (2)

Source: Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary

Manias vs. Phobias – Part 1: Manias (2)

The following comes from Medical Transcription Resource. Any manias found in Manias (1) will not be repeated.

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A

Ailuromania–Intense enthusiasm for cats.
Anthromania–Inordinate interest in flowers.
Arithmomania–Craze for numbers and counting.
Automania–Compulsion toward solitude.

C

Cacodemonomania–Inordinate obsession with demonic possession.
Cheromania–Compulsion toward gaiety.
Chrematomania–Obsessive desire for money.
Coprolalomania–Obsession with foul speech.
Cynomania–Intense enthusiasm for dogs.

E

Eleutheromania–Irresistible craving for freedom.
Entomomania–Inordinate fascination with insects.
Eremiomania–Irresistible craving for stillness.
Ergomania–Obsessive zeal for work.

F

Florimania–Intense interest in plants.

G

Gephyromania–Irresistible fascination with bridges.
Glazomania–Inordinate fascination with listmaking.
Gymnomania–Compulsion toward nakedness.

H

Hedonomania–Irresistible craving for pleasure.
Heliomania–Uncontrollable craving for the sun.
Hippomania–Fascination with and enthusiasm for horses.
Homicidomania–Impulse to commit murder.
Hydromania–Uncontrollable fascination with water.
Hypnomania–Uncontrollable desire for sleep.

I

Ichthyomania–Excessive fascination with fish.

K

Kathisomania–Uncontrollable compulsion to sit.

L

Letheomania–Obsessive fascination with narcotics.

M

Melomania–Excessive fascination with music.
Mythomania–Irresistible impulse toward exaggeration and lying.

N

Nesomania–Intense fascination with islands.
Noctimania–Intense fascination with night.

O

Ochlomania–Intense obsession with crowds.
Oinomania–Inordinate fascination with wine.
Ophidiomania–Excessive interest in reptiles.
Ornithomania–Inordinate fascination with birds.

P

Parousiamania–Obsessive zeal for the second coming of Christ.
Phagomania–1. Irresistible craving for food. 2. Obsessive interest in eating.
Phaneromania–Uncontrollable impulse to pick at a spot or growth on one’s body.
Phonomania–Obsession with noise or sound.

S

Scribomania–Obsessive zeal for writing.
Siderodromomania–Intense fascination with railroad travel.

T

Thalassomania–Intense fascination with the sea.
Timbromania–Inordinate enthusiasm for postage stamps.
Trichomania–Intense fascination with hair.

X

Xenomania–Obsessive interest in foreigners.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

continue to Manias vs. Phobias – Part 2: Phobias (1)

Source: Medical Transcription Resource

Manias vs. Phobias – Part 1: Manias (1)

The following lists of manic definitions are excerpts from Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary and Medical Transcription Resource.

Manias

-mania [Gr., madness] Combining form tthat signifies obsessive preoccupation.

The following comes from Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary.

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A

Ablutomania–Compulsion to wash or clean.
Agromania–Unreasonable desire for solitude or solitudinous wandering. Morbid desire to live in solitude or in the country.
Alcoholomania–Abnormal craving for intoxicants. (Personal note: this, I believe, is different than alcoholism in that alcoholism is a state of being and it is alcoholomania that leads to that state.)

B

Bibliomania–Obsession with the collecting of books.
Bromomania–Mental disorder caused by chronic misuse of bromides.

C

Callomania–Belief in one’s own beauty; a delusion of the insane.
Camphoromania–Abnormal craving for camphor (a gum obtained from an evergreen tree native to China and Japan).
Choreomania–Dancing mania. Seen in the Middle Ages.
Choromania–Dance mania, a form of chorea.
Cleptomania–Kleptomania. Impulsive stealing in which the motive is not related to the intrinsic value of the stolen article. There is often deep regret following the act.
Cocainomania–Intense desire for cocaine and its effects.
Cresomania–Hallucination of possessing great wealth.
Croesomania–Hallucination of possessing great wealth.

D

Dacnomania–An irrational impulse to kill.
Dipsomania–A morbid and uncontrollable craving for alcoholic beverages.
Drapetomania–Insane impulse to wander from home.
Dromomania–Insane impulse to wander.

E

Ecdemomania–Wanderlust; abnormal desire to wander.
Egomania–Abnormal self-esteem and self-interest.
Enomania–Craving for alcoholic beverages.
Enosimania–A mental state characterized by excessive and irrational terror.
Entheomania–Religious insanity.
Ergasiomania–An abnormal desire to be busy at work.
Erotomania–Pathological exaggeration of sexual behavior.
Erythromania–Uncontrolled blushing.
Esthesiomania–Insanity with sensory hallucinations and perverted moral sensibilities.
Etheromania–Addiction to use of ether.

G

Gynecomania–Abnormal sex desire in the male.

H

Histrionic Mania–Dramatic gestures, expressions, and speech in certain psychiatric states.
Hypomania–Mild mania and excitement with moderate change in behavior.

K

Kleptomania–Impulsive stealing, the motive not being in the intrinsic value of the article to the patient. In almost all cases, the individual has enough money to pay for the stolen goods. The stealing is done without prior planning and without the assistance of others. There is increased tension prior to the theft and a sense of gratification while committing the act.

L

Logomania–Repetitious, continuous, and excessive flow of speech seen in monomania.

M

Macromania–1. Megalomania, q.v. 2. The delusion that the affected individual or his or her parts or surroundings are extremely large.
Megalomania–A psychosis characterized by ideas of personal exaltation and delusions of grandeur.
Methomania–Pathological craving for intoxicating drinks or other intoxicants.
Monomania–Mental illness characterized by distortion of thought processes concerning a single subject or idea.
Musicomania–Insane love of music.

N

Necromania–1. Abnormal interest in dead bodies or in death. 2. Mania with desire for death.
Nostomania–Nostalgia verging on insanity.
Nudomania–Abnormal desire to be nude.
Nymphomania–Abnormal excessive sexual desire in a female.

O

Oikomania–Nervous disorder induced by unhappy home surroundings.
Oniomania–A psychoneurotic urge to spend money.
Onomatomania–A mental derangement characterized by an abnormal impulse to dwell upon or repeat certain words by attaching significance to their imagined hidden meanings or by trying frantically to recall a particular word.
Onychotillomania–A neurotic tendency to pick the nails.
Opiomania–Insane craving for opium or its derivatives.
Opsomania–Craving for some special article of food.

P

Paramania–A type of emotional disturbance in which the individual derives pleasure from complaining.
Paratereseomania–Insane desire to investigate new scenes and subjects.
Peotillomania–A nervous habit or tic consisting of constant pulling at the penis.
Pharmacomania–Abnormal desire for giving or taking medicines.
Phonomania–Insanity characterized by tendency to commit murder.
Photomania–1. A psychosis produced by prolonged exposure to intense light. 2. A psychotic desire for light.
Planomania–Morbid desire to wander and to be free of social restraints.
Plutomania–Delusion that one is very rich.
Poriomania–Morbid desire to wander from home.
Posiomania–Addiction to alcoholic drinks.
Pyromania–Fire madness; mania for setting fires or seeing them.

S

Satyromania–Satyriasis, q.v. (Excessive, and often uncontrollable, sexual drive in men.)
Sebastomania–Religious insanity.
Sitiomania–Periodic abnormal appetite or craving for food.
Sitomania–1. Periodic abnormal craving for food. 2. Periodic abnormality of appetite.
Sophomania–Unrealistic belief in one’s own wisdom.
Syphilomania–Morbid fear of syphilis or inference that one is suffering with it.

T

Thanatomania–Condition of homicidal or suicidal mania.
Theomania–Religious insanity; esp. That in which the patient thinks he is a deity or has divine inspiration.
Tomomania–1. Tendency of a surgeon to resort to unnecessary surgical operations. 2. Abnormal desire to be operated upon.
Toxicomania–Abnormal craving for narcotics, intoxicants, or poisons.
Trichokryptomania–Abnormal desire to break off the hair or beard with the fingernail.
Trichorrexomania–The abnormal habit of breaking off the hair with the fingernails.
Tristimania–Melancholia.

Z

Zoomania–A morbid and excessive affection for animals.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

continue to Manias vs. Phobias – Part 1: Manias (2)

Source: Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary

Reality Checks for Career Planning

Get in the Right Mindset

Ever feel like you’re expected to have your whole life all planned out by now? Early on, the pressure can be there to answer the question, “So, what do you want to be?” Well, guess what? It’s in your best interest to remain flexible and explore your options.

Stay Flexible

Here are some principles to help you keep things in perspective, whether you know exactly what you want to do, have some general ideas, or are still figuring things out.

You can’t plan your whole life ahead of time.

Have you ever heard someone say something like, “I fell into my career”? That’s because as important as planning and research are, chance still plays a role. Keep an open mind and learn to tolerate some degree of uncertainty.

You change over time.

As your life circumstances evolve—you get older, develop new insights—your feelings about what you want to do will evolve. You need to be able to reorient yourself when necessary.

The work world changes over time.

The job title webmaster didn’t even exist a generation ago. Developments occur so rapidly that the form a career takes now could be very different in a few years. It’s a balancing act. Keep track of your own changing wants while also keeping an eye on the horizon.

No job will be without some things that bug you.

Don’t fall into the trap of expecting to find the perfect career. Identify the elements of your ideal path, and then decide where you’re willing to compromise.

Satisfaction, not status, is key.

Many people feel pulled to a field that’s familiar, popular, or high status. You’ll be much happier and far more successful if you find something that relates to your own interests and strengths. Qualities that you take for granted can be valuable assets in many career fields.

So What Can (or Should) You Be Doing Now?

Okay, you don’t have to make a 10-year plan today. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t start discovering what you’re passionate about. Here are some quick exercises to get going:

Write down 10 qualities that create a portrait of you.

Are you friendly, creative, impatient, silly? To test your list, ask yourself if your friends would recognize you from your description.

List five strengths and five weaknesses.

It’s probably obvious how your strengths can be used—look for careers that tap into them. But your weaknesses are important, too. Are there things you need to improve in order to reach a goal?

Describe three experiences that taught you something about yourself.

Identify the one that gave you the greatest sense of achievement or satisfaction and write a clear sentence that states why. Experience can teach us about ourselves and guide our life choices.

Make a list of 10 things that you’re passionate about.

What classes have been especially engaging? What activities pass the “time flies” test—where you’re so absorbed in something that you don’t even notice how much time is passing? This list of interests can become your springboard to careers.

Browse Major & Career Profiles.

What does an actuary actually do? Does the future look bright for architects? Imagine yourself in different roles as you research careers on collegeboard.com. The Major & Career Profiles cover over 300 careers, ranging from air traffic control and athletic training to veterinary medicine and Web design.

Remember, even if you know someone who has been certain since age seven that she wants to be a doctor, in reality, very few people know at a young age what they want to do or be. You have time to get to know yourself and find careers that fit.

Source: collegeboard.com